Pitchdeck


Fundraising Prep

Pitchdeck

A pitch deck is a presentation that a founder uses to tell investors about their company. It can be used as the foundation of an in-person fundraising presentation or shared with prospective investors as a standalone document.
A pitch deck can be a Powerpoint, Open Office, Keynote, Google Slides, or it can simply be a written document presented in PDF format. We recommend that you create your pitch deck in the format recommended by Sequoia Capital (their description here) and example pitchdeck here).

These are the elements you need to cover in your pitch deck.

What’s the problem?
Your company is providing a specific product or service that solves a problem for your prospective customers. Describe the problem in clear, understandable terms.
What’s your solution?
Describe specifically how your startup will solve the problem or problems you’ve identified, along with your value proposition to customers. After identifying the problem, explain the specific way your startup will solve it and your value proposition to customers.
Why now and why you?
Why is your solution relevant now, and why are you and your team the best people to develop and deliver it?
Who are your customers?
Who are your customer and what do they do? Explain why they chose your product or service, and what they are paying for it. No customers yet? Describe your target market, target persona and how you will win their business.
What is your go-to-market strategy?
A go-to-market strategy (GTM) is your company’s plan for how you will launch your product, build a customer base, and establish a competitive advantage. Determine the market size and the segment of the market your company is targeting. Include research you’ve done to determine the proper segment and a strategy for how you will pitch your product to that particular segment. Describe your TAM, SAM and SOM.
Who’s on your team?
A company’s executives and employees are some of its most important factors in determining whether its GTM strategy will be a success. What about their strengths, experience and expertise makes them the right fit for this company?
What’s the competition?
Describe your direct and indirect competition and how you compete against them.
What are your projected financials and what are your key metrics?
Potential investors like to see a detailed picture of your company’s finances, including key metrics like revenue, profit or loss, expenses, and burn rate. Include financial models when possible and recent company valuations, such as your pre-money valuation and post-money valuation from any prior venture rounds.
How will you use investors’ money?
When you’re actively seeking new capital from VCs you should have a plan for what you hope to do with their capital. Break down how your company will use its new financial resources. Some common uses for newly raised capital include increasing headcount, increasing spending on R&D, and financing acquisitions or other investments.